Nursery Rhymes

Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen

Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen Lyrics

The words and lyrics of this African American Spiritual begin with "Nobody knows de trouble Iíve seen" as the first line of the song. The words, tune and lyrics of the "Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen" song were passed on verbally and the names of the author and composer are therefore unknown.

Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen Song Meaning and History
The history of the "Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen" song lyrics date back to the Slave Plantations between the 1600's to 1800's. Meaning: The solemn, sorrowful song was sung by slaves reflecting the hard, cruel life of a slave that was acknowledged by no one but God.  It was often sung at religious gatherings or as a work song to accompany the daily grind of working in the fields picking cotton or plowing, hoeing and harvesting crops. We have placed "Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen" in the category of African American Spirituals, aka Negro Spirituals and Slave Songs.

Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen Song
Title: Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen *** Name of Composer: Unknown *** Name Author / Writer of Lyrics: Unknown *** Category: Slave Songs aka African American Spirituals or Negro Spirituals

Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen Lyrics

Nobody knows de trouble Iíve seen
Nobody knows de trouble but Jesus
Nobody knows de trouble Iíve seen
Glory Hallelujah!

Sometimes Iím up, sometimes Iím down
Oh, yes, Lord
Sometimes Iím almost to de grouní
Oh, yes, Lord

Although you see me goiní Ďlong so
Oh, yes, Lord
I have my trials here below
Oh, yes, Lord

If you get there before I do
Oh, yes, Lord
Tell all-a my friends Iím coming too
Oh, yes, Lord

Information about the Song
Title of Song: Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen
Author of Lyrics: Unknown
Nationality of Author: African American
Name of Music Composer: Unknown
Song Category: Slave Songs aka African American Spirituals or Negro Spirituals
First Line of Song: "Nobody knows de trouble Iíve seen"
First Publication Date: 1867. The lyrics of the song were first published in 'Slave Songs of the United States'.

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